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Mrs Sherry Hughes 5th Grade ELA

Mrs. Hughes: 

Welcome to Fifth Grade ELA!

This will be an exciting year in fifth grade and I’m so happy to be a part of an amazing team of teachers. This year will be an adventure as we embark on a block schedule of teaching reading and writing as one class! It will be a great experience to work with you to develop your  passion for reading and writing.

In our classroom, I value your ideas, thoughts and actions.  You have unique talents and strengths, and I cannot wait for you to share them with me and your classmates.  You will bring so much to our class. I’m looking forward to learning more about you!

I have been part of the St John Fisher community for over 20 years! All four of my children (and my husband) have graduated from SJF. I feel  blessed  to work as well as live in a wonderful community.   It truly is a privilege to work in a faithful, inclusive and catholic community.  Go Falcons!

How to Write a True Story

Posted on Sep 17, 2019

How to Write a True Story

 

  1.  Think of something that happened to you.  (Trouble, Things were hard)

Think of parts of your story:

What did you do that shows how the trouble starts?

What did someone say or do that shows the trouble getting worse?

How did the trouble get solved/resolved?

  1.  Touch the pages and tell the story.

  Hint: Say the actual words you write.

     3,  Sketch what happened on each page.

     4.  Write!!!! Hint: On each page, just write one part of the story!

5th ELA guide

Posted on Sep 03, 2019

5th Grade ELA:

Welcome Back to School!

Fifth Grade Language Arts Program

Sherry Hughes shughes@sjfschool.net

 

Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him.-Maya Angelou

 

Welcome to fifth grade ELA!!! This year, we will be combining reading and writing to create an ELA curriculum.  The mechanical part of the grammar and vocabulary will be taught by Mrs. Quinn.

I’m very excited to be able to share our  reading and writing curriculum with fifth grade students this year.  This curriculum adheres to Common Core State Standards, and is based on 35 years of research and development made by the Teachers College at Columbia University, and spearheaded by Lucy Calkins.  I know that the fifth grade students at St John Fisher School are really going to enjoy becoming better writers and readers, and I look forward to facilitating their progress!

 

The Teachers College Writing workshop model allows students to have the “last” word by allowing students to take something commonplace in his/her life and give it meaning.  Students learn that their lives are worth writing about, and that they should care about what they write. Using the foundations of the curriculum, students will see that writing is a craft, and they will enjoy learning how to become better writers through hard work and practice.  Writing will happen every day, and students will write in a variety of ways that touch on several different genres. Students will not be assigned specific topics, but will have flexibility to choose to write about what matters to them, within the guidelines of the specific genres of study.

 

What does Writing Workshop look like in the classroom?

Writing workshop begins with a mini lesson that teaches a new strategy. A sample of writing  that is specific to the unit or genre being studied is demonstrated.

Helpful charts are on display in the classroom.  These charts are visual reminders that reinforce writing strategies; they may help with dialogue, structure, elaboration or conventions.  

Ideas are generated and students practice telling their story to a partner.  Storytelling is a rehearsal for writing; students develop ideas. Students possibly create a timeline and identify their feelings at each point of the timeline.

Nurturing and growing the seed idea comes next through rehearsal; students are encourage to re-read their entry and think about the big, important events in this moment, what are they thinking/feeling at each point, how did they change as the story unfolds.  Students learn to make a writing plan. Some ways to make a writing plan are:

-create a timeline that tracks our stories and emotion

-take small moments and break them into a beginning, middle and end

-make a story booklet with illustrations of four major events (this forces students to remember and start thinking about major themes)

-students then tell their story to their writing partner

-drafting is the next step in the process

-revision occurs next

-we will use a mentor text for examples of dialogue

-publishing process will allow students to publish their writing where it will be enjoyed not solely by the teacher but by their peers.  It will be a big celebration!!

Grade 5 Writing Curriculum

By the end of fifth grade, students are more skilled at writing in various genres.

Unit 1: Raising the Level of Personal Narrative/Memoir

Unit 2: The Interpretive Essay

Unit 3: Informational writing

Unit 4: Research based argument essay

Unit 5: Literary and comparative Essays

Unit 6:  Historical fiction/Mixed Genre Writing

Unit 7: Writing in the Content Area/Research based informational writing/Fantasy Writing

Unit 8: Poetry

 

The Reading Workshop is not like traditional literacy programs. We will not be using textbooks, workbooks, or whole class texts.  The workshop model is founded on the following beliefs, which are rooted in literacy research:

-Learners need opportunities to read high interest, accessible  books of their own choosing

-Learners need long stretches of time to read

-Learners need teachers to read aloud

-Learners need assessment based instruction, including feedback that is tailored specifically to them.  Strugglers especially need instruction that is tailored specifically toward their specific strengths and needs, as well as extra time and help.

-Learners need a balanced approach to language arts, one that includes a responsible approach to the teaching of writing as well as reading.

-Learners need explicit instruction in the skills of proficient readers.

-Learners need opportunities to talk and write in response to texts.

 

What does Reading Workshop look like?

A reading workshop classroom relies on teacher-led instruction in the form of a mini lesson which aims to teach a specific reading skill or strategy.  The mini lesson is intended to take ten minutes. A more significant block of time (30 minutes) is devoted to independent practice, where students read self-selected books and practice the skill taught in the mini lesson.  During this time, I confer with individuals or small groups. This is the most valuable part of the workshop, as I will target the needs of each student throughout the week. The third portion of Reading Workshop includes time for students to share what they read and how they applied the mini lesson to their reading.  The share will be either small group or whole class. The above structure will be CONSISTENT every day. Other elements of Reading Workshop include interactive read alouds, book clubs, guided reading and shared reading.

 

How will my child be assessed?

Assessment in the RWW is ongoing.  I confer with individual students and groups of students, keeping records of the progress of the student.  I will be taking notes on our conferences and periodically take a “running record” of a student’s reading. Student progress is measured against grade level rubrics for fluency, comprehension, written responses and participation in workshops.

(Accelerated readers will be part of the curriculum. See information below for that requirement.)

 

Reading Logs

I will expect the students to keep a reading log journal. This should be an honest reflection of their reading each day. I will use this as a tool to monitor their progress. Please make sure that is a true reflection of their reading accomplishments.

I will use these logs to understand their reading progress.  (Momentum, holes in reading list?, trends if not finishing a book, avoiding certain genres, is the student stalled?)

 

 

 

Accelerated reading

Since this is a program that is implemented in our SJF curriculum, I will ask the students to participate. 

 

From my reading about reading this summer, here are some thoughts I found:

Kids motivation and interest in reading is higher when they have the opportunity to read in school.

Researcher Stephen Krashen found that students in free reading programs performed better than or equal to students in any other reading program.

Providing students the opportunity to choose their own books to read enpowers and encourages them. This strengthens their self-confidence, rewards their interest, and promotes a positive attitude toward reading by valuing the reader and giving them a level of control.  Readers without the power to make their own choices can become unmotivated.

Direct reading instruction allows time to apply what they learn in the context of real reading events.

Give approval of their reading choice no matter what their reading choice because this is far preferable to their deciding not to read at all.

 

Our grades are weighted into three categories:

Accelerated/Homework

Classwork/Notebook Work

Extended Responses/Test/Quizzes

Welcome back

Posted on Aug 21, 2019

Welcome to Fifth Grade ELA!

This will be an exciting year in fifth grade and I’m so happy to be a part of an amazing team of teachers. This year will be an adventure as we embark teaching reading and writing! It will be a great experience to work with you to develop your  passion for reading and writing.

In our classroom, I value your ideas, thoughts and actions.  You have unique talents and strengths, and I cannot wait for you to share them with me and your classmates.  You will bring so much to our class. I’m looking forward to learning more about you!

I have been part of the St John Fisher community for over 20 years! All four of my children (and my husband) have graduated from SJF.   It truly is a privilege to work in a faithful, inclusive and catholic community.  Go Falcons!

Game Board

Posted on May 24, 2019

After you select your science fiction or fantasy book, try to visualize making a game, which incorporates parts of the book. Use the following guidelines when you create your board game:

  1. Use the characters in your book as “the pieces” of the game. You must have at least two game pieces.

  2. Use the setting of the book as the game board. Remember that color can make all the difference. Use a lot of color and keep in mind that you want your game board to be neat and well organized. Your game board must be made out of poster board or of some other material that is thicker than construction paper. Your game board must be at least 18 inches high, as well as 18 inches wide. If you are planning to make your game board a special shape, be sure that your board would fit the 18” x 18” measurement if it were in a square.

  3. Use the plot of the book as the moves of the game. These plot moves will give players information about the story as they play your game. You must include at least 25 moves in your game.

  4. Write clear, concise instructions, explaining how to play the game. Your directions must be written out in a creative way. In other words, do not simply write the directions on a piece of binder paper. Think of a neat way to tie the directions into your game.

Your grade for this project will be based on the clarity of your instructions, the appearance of the game board, the creativity of the game, and the entertainment potential of your game, as well as on how well you followed instructions and included the required criteria. In addition, your game MUST reflect the content of your book

 

Biography Bottle Project

Posted on Jan 22, 2019

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